Karin Torrice - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage


Selling a home can be challenging, even for an individual who is laser-focused on getting the best price for his or her house. Fortunately, we're here to help you achieve the best-possible results during the home selling journey.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you obtain the best price for your residence.

1. Study the Prices of Comparable Residences in Your Area

Your home may seem like it is one of a kind, but there likely are comparable houses in your city or town. If you take a look at the prices of comparable houses in your area, you may be better equipped than ever before to establish a competitive initial asking price for your residence.

Also, studying the prices of comparable residences in your area enables you to see how your house stacks up against the competition. And if you find your home pales in comparison to its rivals, you may want to dedicate time and resources to upgrade your house. That way, you can help your house stand out to potential buyers.

2. Conduct a Home Appraisal

A home appraisal commonly is requested by a buyer after a seller accepts his or her offer to purchase a residence and a property appraisal has been completed. However, it may be beneficial for a seller to conduct a home appraisal, especially if this individual wants to get the optimal price for his or her residence.

By conducting a home appraisal, you can receive expert insights into how much your house is currently worth. Then, you can use your home appraisal results to set an aggressive initial asking price for your residence.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

If you are unsure about how to price your residence, you may want to hire a real estate agent. Because if you have a real estate agent at your side, you can quickly and effortlessly accomplish your property selling goals.

First, a real estate agent will meet with you and learn about your residence. This housing market professional next will help you establish a competitive initial asking price for your home that accounts for the current state of the real estate market. A real estate agent then will list your home, promote it to potential buyers and set up home showings and open house events. And if you receive an offer to purchase your residence, a real estate agent can help you review this proposal and decide how to proceed.

Of course, a real estate agent will do everything possible to help you maximize your house sale earnings too. He or she will negotiate with a buyer's agent on your behalf and ensure you can get the best price for your residence – regardless of the current housing market's conditions.

Don't wait to list your home and maximize your home sale profits. Instead, take advantage of the aforementioned home selling tips, and you can boost the likelihood of a fast, profitable property selling experience.


In some instances, it may be beneficial to reject an offer to purchase your home. Because if a homebuying proposal fails to meet your expectations, you may want to wait for another offer to come your way.

Reviewing a homebuying proposal and determining whether to reject this offer can be tricky. But we're here to help you evaluate an offer to purchase so you can decide the best course of action and feel confident about your choice.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you assess an offer to purchase and determine whether to decline.

1. Review the Local Housing Market

The housing market in your city or town is a major factor in the property selling journey. If you're selling your residence in a buyer's market, you likely face steep competition to sell your house and maximize its value. Comparatively, if you're operating in a seller's market, there may be an abundance of buyers and a shortage of sellers in place.

Take a look at the prices of recently sold residences and how long these properties were listed before they sold. You may want to consider the prices of currently available houses in your area that are similar to your residence too. With this housing market data in hand, you can differentiate a buyer's market from a seller's one and take a data-driven approach to decide how to proceed with an offer to purchase.

2. Weigh Your Home's Strengths and Weaknesses

You believe your home is great, but you also realize that your residence is far from perfect. As such, it often helps to weigh your residence's strengths and weaknesses relative to an offer to purchase and proceed accordingly.

For example, if a homebuyer submits a competitive offer to purchase your home in spite of its exterior damage, you may want to accept this proposal. On the other hand, if a buyer submits a "lowball" offer on your recently upgraded house, you may want to decline this proposal.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

If you're unsure about whether to reject an offer to purchase, there is no need to worry. You can always hire a real estate agent, and this housing market professional can provide comprehensive support throughout the property selling journey.

A real estate agent is ready to help you in any way possible. If you need help listing your residence and promoting it to prospective buyers, a real estate agent can assist you. Or, if you want to find innovative ways to enhance your residence's curb appeal, a real estate agent can provide home exterior upgrade recommendations.

Of course, a real estate agent will work with you to review any offer to purchase your house. You and your real estate agent together can discuss the pros and cons of a homebuying proposal and make a decision that corresponds to your house selling goals.

Take the guesswork out of reviewing an offer to purchase – use the aforementioned tips, and you can decide whether rejecting a homebuying proposal is the best option.


Congratulations on your recent home sale! Now, you just need to figure out how to tell family members, friends and other loved ones that you'll be packing up and moving out of your current residence.

Informing loved ones about a home sale may seem challenging at first. Fortunately, we're here to help you keep your cool as you tell loved ones that you've sold your house.

Here are three tips to ensure you can avoid the stress and headaches sometimes associated with informing loved ones about your decision to sell your home.

1. Get Ready for Questions

Loved ones have your best interests in mind, and as such, likely will have many questions about why you sold your residence.

What prompted you to sell your home now? How much did you receive for your home? And where do you plan to live in the future? These are just some of the questions that you should be ready to face from family members, friends and other loved ones.

Moreover, answer loved ones' questions as best you can. And if you are uncertain or uncomfortable about answering a question, you can politely decline to respond.

2. Keep an Open Mind

Things will move quickly after you sell your home. Although you may have plans to buy a new residence or relocate out of state at some point, you might still need time to finalize your next move.

Oftentimes, loved ones may pressure you to move in a certain direction following your home sale. But it is essential to keep the best interests of yourself and your family in mind at all times.

If family members or friends pressure you to make a move that makes you feel uncomfortable, let them know. Remember, your loved ones want you to be happy, and they should be willing to listen to your concerns after you share the news that you have sold your residence.

3. Operate Fearlessly

After you accept a homebuyer's offer for your residence, the toughest part of the home selling journey is over. At this point, you can finalize your home sale and move forward with the next stage of your life.

It takes a lot of courage to sell a house, and you should maintain this confidence as you tell loved ones about your home selling decision.

Regardless of how a loved one feels about your decision to sell your house, what's most important is how you feel about your choice. If you believe you made the best decision possible, you should feel good, even if family members or friends disagree.

When it comes to telling loved ones about your home selling decision, don't forget to reach out to your real estate for assistance. This real estate professional understands the challenges of informing family members and friends about a home selling decision and may be able to offer expert guidance. That way, you can remain poised and confident as you share your home selling news with others.


Many sellers aren’t sure how to give a positive spin to their small backyard. We imagine that most homeowners want a large expanse of green with various types of trees and maybe even room for a vegetable garden.

However, there are ways to make a small yard a good thing. After all, less yard means less grass to mow and water and worry over when drought hits.

In this article, we’re going to give you some tips on making your tiny yard appealing to buyers.

Decorate wisely

Making an area seem more spacious is often a matter of smart decorating. Just like you can make a room appear bigger with bright colors and mirrors, you can make a yard appear bigger with proper landscaping and outdoor furniture.

When it comes to patio furniture, keep it simple. You don’t need a massive set of furniture in a small yard, and filling your yard up with chairs will make it feel crowded.

Choose a few well-placed decorations for your yard, and keep it simple.

Container gardening

A good way to make a small yard feel more in touch with nature is to plant in containers. Sticking to a central theme with your plants will give the yard a sense of continuity and simplicity that will make it feel welcoming.

Container gardening is also a good option for people who live in arid areas prone to drought. You can choose drought resistant plants that are easy to maintain.

Landscaping is key

You know how a cluttered and messy bedroom feels small and unwelcoming? The same is true for a cluttered and unkempt backyard. Cutting the grass and trimming the trees and hedges will go a long way. However, also remember to not use your backyard as a storage space. Tools and equipment that aren’t put away will make the yard feel even smaller than it already is.

Set a focal point

Small backyards don’t need a lot of features and amenities. One key area is enough to satisfy the eye. Rather than choosing several small decorations, stick to one thing. Whether it’s a small box garden, a fireplace, or a well-placed tree, drawing the eye is one way to distract from the size of the space.

Small is a style

The last important thing to keep in mind is that houses with small backyards are usually found in locations where small backyards are expected. You wouldn’t dream of finding a large backyard behind a class brownstone in Brooklyn, and as a result, the small backyards of those builds have taken on a charm of their own.

If you aren’t sure about how to incorporate landscaping and decorations in your tiny backyard, look up some inspiration online for urban backyards that match the style of your home. This will attract buyers who are already looking for something that your home already has--character.


Selling a home takes patience. Especially when you’re balancing your time between settling into your new home, and keeping up with your work and family life. So, when you’ve finally gotten to the point of accepting an offer on your home, you’ll probably breathe a sigh of relief--and you should!  However, there are still a few more things that will need to happen and a couple of things to consider before closing the deal on your home sale.

Contingencies on the purchase contract

A purchase contract typically includes contingency clauses that are designed to protect the interests of both the buyer and the seller. These clauses mean that the contract is contingent upon the actions being completed before it can be legally valid.

There are three main contingencies that will likely be included in the purchase contract before closing--inspection, financing, and appraisal.

Inspection contingency

The inspection contingency allows the buyer to have the home inspected by a professional before closing (the time should be specified within the contract, but the inspection should usually occur no more than two weeks after you accept the offer). A home inspection lets the buyer know what to expect in terms of repairs that the home needs now or will need in the near future.

Financing contingency

Since the vast majority of buyers will be purchasing their home through a loan, a financing contingency is included to allow the buyer time to secure their mortgage. Getting pre-qualified and pre-approved makes this process easier, but the buyer will still have to finalize and close on their mortgage before their financing is official.

This clause exists to protect the buyer in the event that their mortgage application is denied, ensuring that they aren’t penalized.

Appraisal contingency

The third contingency most often found in purchase contracts is a home appraisal. The buyer will order an appraisal and then the appraiser will reach out to you to find a day to come and value your home.

If the home is then appraised at the amount agreed upon in your contract, this contingency is met. However, if the appraisal comes up lower than the purchase amount, the buyer can renegotiate the price.

Walkthrough and closing

Once the appraisal and inspection have been met and financing secured, the buyer will have a chance to do a final walkthrough of your home. The walkthrough usually occurs no more than two days prior to closing on the sale. A walkthrough allows the buyer view the home one last time to ensure that the condition of the home hasn’t drastically changed since the home was inspected or appraised. So, make sure the buyer is aware of any changes you planned to make to the home before closing.

Now you’re ready to close on your home sale. You’ll receive a disclosure form to review (read it carefully!) and sign. Once closing is complete, ownership of the home is officially transferred to the buyer.

While the closing process does include several steps, it’s important to be available and cooperative along the way to ensure a smooth sale and transition into your new home.




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